Analysis: Jackson Case Will Change The Tune For Concert, Artist Insurance

Currently, promoters pay 3 percent to 5 percent of the value of the policy, meaning that AEG paid between $530,000 and $875,000 for the $17.5 million policy it took out with Lloyds of London for Jackson’s “This is It” tour. AEG, which had initially sought to collect on the $17.5 million policy after Jackson’s death canceled the tour, dropped a claim against Lloyds amid revelations in leaked emails that show AEG executives were concerned about his stability ahead of his planned London comeback tour. Insurers routinely send doctors to do medical exams — and occasionally hire investigators for background checks– before placing multi-million dollar policies for the stars. After the Jackson trial, the reams of information they need will skyrocket, said Adam Steck, CEO of SPI Entertainment, who recently brokered a deal for an 18-show run by rocker Meatloaf at Planet Hollywood in Vegas, starting September 26. “We’re in a high risk business, said Steck. “The case will require artists to disclose medical conditions and the producer will need to insure and vet them properly, meaning more red tape. This could affect ticket pricing at the end of the day.” In its wrongful death suit against AEG, Jackson’s family claimed AEG negligently hired Murray as Jackson’s personal physician and ignored signs Jackson, who died in 2009 at 50 from an overdose of propofol, was in poor health. AEG Live argued Jackson’s prescription drug and addiction problems predated their deal and that it did not hire Murray or see he was a danger to the star. Even though Lloyds didn’t pay off on Jackson’s death, legal and insurance experts say artists’ coverage will now carry many more exclusions — specific instances of prior injuries, drug use and now perhaps negligence by staff that won’t be covered – giving promoters and insurance firms an out from paying claims if stars do not fulfill obligations due to negligence by a person on the star’s staff. “There will be exclusions for personal assistants, doctors, anybody but the performer,” said Jon Pfeiffer, an entertainment attorney in Los Angeles. “If an assistant or professional does something wrong, the artist will go after the assistant and not AEG.” Insurers wound up settling with Spears after she sued a group for almost $10 million in 2005, after she was forced to cancel the European leg of a tour due to a knee injury. Spears and her promoter had bought “contingency insurance” from several companies including Liberty Syndicate Management Ltd, French company AXA’s AXA Corporate Solutions, one of the more common policies that cover abandonment, cancellation or postponement of a concert. The companies initially refused to pay Spears for losses arising from the canceled shows, claiming she failed to disclose surgery performed on her knee five years earlier. Spears had passed the insurance company’s required medical exam a year before the tour was to begin. John Callagy, attorney for Spears in the case, told Reuters it became apparent the insurance companies were aware of her prior knee injuries from earlier insurance applications.

Concert to benefit music foundation The Project Matters to be held Wednesday at Mexicali Live

I lived it. I witnessed it. We had the means for $10 here and $10 there, a lot of kids don’t.” The retired teacher from Freehold, her husband William and son Matt started The Project Matters in memory of her other son, Benjamin, a musician who died at 19. Since its inception, the foundation has bought those strings and done much more, including buying instruments and renting studio time for New Jersey bands with musicians 21 and under. After doing some research, they choose a band to help for a year. The fourth band to benefit from The Project Matters named after Benjamin’s posthumously pressed CD named “Matters” is GNGR (pronounced ginger), who will be playing Wednesday night at the organization’s benefit concert at Mexicali Live in Teaneck . “It’s provided gear and financial support that’s also going into recordings,” said GNGR guitarist Jake Lefkowitz, 17 and a senior at Wayne Hills High School. GNGR is a rock band made up of five guys from North Jersey who got connected through School of Rock. Four of them are seniors in high school, and one graduated last spring. Lefkowitz describes their music as “rock at its simplest terms. Foo Fighters meets Skynyrd, all the way back to The Doors and Pearl Jam.” They play all original songs except for a few covers. Wednesday night one of those cover songs will be Benjamin High’s “Motorway.” “It’s not just they’re helping us, we want to help them because of their cause,” said Lefkowitz of The Project Matters. “We’re trying to spread the music their son wrote. We’re trying to get them out there.

Concert to feature new, familiar pieces

Exciting trills of the woodwinds, vibrant fanfare from the brass, antiphonal trumpets, sounds of the boisterous organ and rhythmic patterns of the percussion are just a few of the sounds that will resonate from the concert hall of Moody Music Building on Monday night, Danielle Todd, a graduate conductor for the concert band and trumpet player for the symphonic band, said. Both the symphonic band and concert band are composed of both music and non-music majors who underwent a competitive blind audition in order to participate. The upcoming concert is not only an opportunity for students to enjoy a performance put on by their peers, but a chance to highlight the musical talents of several UA students. The concert will showcase the talents of many students from various backgrounds, ages, majors and experience, as well as highlight musical selections that are vibrant, aggressive, soulful and fun, Todd said. With their performance, the two bands seek to engage people of all musical preferences, from contemporary pop to rock to classical, while simultaneously dispelling the connotation associated with symphonic and concert bands. When people hear the terms symphonic band and concert band, they automatically think of older, classical music, Randall Coleman, associate director of bands and conductor of the symphonic and concert bands, said. This presents a challenge since most college students prefer to listen to new songs on the radio. However, I think our program successfully encompasses many different musical tastes by providing fast-paced, contemporary music thats easy to listen to. Similarly, Todd said the symphonic bands and concert bands are much more relatable than most people realize. They are not limited to older music, and students will be surprised to find that many of the pieces in the concert will be familiar to them. This concert will provide sounds that are familiar and recognizable, as well as some that are new and different, Todd said. The overarching goal of the concert is to promote the Alabama symphonic band and Alabama concert band, and by extension the music program as a whole. The concert allows the bands an outlet for their hard work, and ticket sales will benefit the music program. Weve worked hard to present a quality program, and we wont disappoint, Christopher Henley, a freshman majoring in organ performance and a guest member of the symphonic band, said. The concert will be held Monday at 7:30 p.m.