Worth 3d? ‘gravity’ And 10 More Movies That Benefit From The Upgrade

Gravity

An infection that were all carrying, and the guarantee of turning when you die, whether youre bitten or not? The zombie plague of Walking Dead is just this and that adds to the fear factor. The promise of seeing your friends, family and fellow survivors suffer such a terrible fate makes the possibility of a zombie apocalypse that much scarier. And with no true cause or cure for zombie-itis, its hard to be prepared though the CDC does have some Zombie Preparedness articles to look through if youre worried about an impending zombie takeover. Government Takeovers White House Down and Olympus Has Fallen were both released in 2013, and both cover the topic of attacks on the White House. Were well aware that attacks like this could happen as weve all lived through an attack on our country its something that we can all relate to and easily understand the terror of what this real-life situation would be like. While situations like these might not directly have an effect on us, theyre situations that would greatly impact our daily lives, making them truly unnerving. The What If This Happened To Me Situations Movies like The Strangers or Panic Room instill fear because they depict feasible, real-life situations. No one wants to live through a scene from a horror movie and these movies make that clear. Home invasions and kidnappings are terrifying because theyre so realistic. As unfortunate as it is, the situations happen to real people, and that terror feels very real when watching it on-screen and imagining facing similar circumstances. Todays scary movies make it clear that the movies that keep moviegoers on the edges of their seats illustrate fear of the unknown and realistic situations.

Avatar (2009) James Camerons epic fantasy introduced many moviegoers to 3D for the first time, and the director used the format to immerse viewers in the world of Pandora. It went on to become the highest-grossing film of all time with nearly $2.8 billion at the worldwide box office. Need we say more? Coraline(2009) Henry Selicks Coraline from LAIKA was the first feature length 3D stop motion film. The story, which incorporated an alternative universe, used a nearly flat image forCoralines real world, to create the feeling that she feels constricted by her life; and lots of depth as she entered the more exciting alternate world. Selick likened his use of 3D to the way in which color was used inThe Wizard of Oz. Dial M for Murder(1954) While it’s not widely known as a 3D film, Alfred Hitchocks classic was filmed with depth in mind. The most often-cited shot was the one during which Grace Kelly extends her hand into the audience as she reaches for a pair of scissors as she is being attacked. But it was also the way that the director used space to tell the storytaken from a stage play that occurs mostly in a one-bedroom apartmentthat adds to the suspense. How to Train Your Dragon(2010) DreamWorks Animation maintains a high standard for 3D and multiple DWA titles would be appropriate for a list such as this. But its Oscar-nominated How To Train Your Dragon is still considered to be the studios masterpiece in 3D circles.

Stiller Deflates ‘Walter Mitty’; China Violence: Movies

Rating: **1/2 (Evans) Swaggering Capitalism Jia Zhangkes A Touch of Sin shows a China spiritually disintegrating under capitalism, an increasingly violent country where the rich swagger and the poor struggle for their little portion of dignity — a country, in other words, not all that different from the U.S. The protagonists of its four stories, all based on widely reported incidents, resort to brutality in different ways and for different reasons — anger, profit, self-defense, self-hatred. (One is a suicide.) In the first and most arresting of the sections, a miner (Jiang Wu), tormented by his sense of fairness, gets pushed over the brink by the ostentatious corruption of local officials and the mealy-mouthed willingness of everyone but him to accept it. It shows how obnoxious a real whistle-blower might be: always obsessing about injustice, acting out his fury in futile, damaging ways, hurling accusations at all the unhappy weaklings around him who just want to get on with their lives. The other sections involve an armed robbery, a rape and a youth sinking into anomie. Theyre absorbing (and gorgeously shot), but the whole feels disparate and, for that reason, a little unsatisfying. A Touch of Sin, from Kino Lorber, is playing in New York and opens in Los Angeles on Oct. 11. Rating: *** (Seligman) The Dog In August 1972, John Wojtowicz botched a bank robbery that was supposed to finance a sex change for his boyfriend (he called him his wife) and took the bank employees hostage. Excited crowds filled the Brooklyn street; three years later, Al Pacino played him in Dog Day Afternoon . Wojtowicz, grown heavy and gray, is the subject of The Dog , a charming, sad and completely fascinating film by Allison Berg and Frank Keraudren. Wojtowicz is a motormouth who calls himself a pervert owing to his obsession with sex.